NRS Homepage
About NRS People Research Undergraduate Program Graduate Program Courses Resources Home
 

Undergraduate Majors

Environmental Science and Management
The major in environmental management, offered by the Department of Natural Resources Science, prepares undergraduate students for professional careers in the public and private sectors of natural resources management. Flexible course requirements allow students to develop individual areas of concentration and prepare for a variety of positions in environmental management after graduation. This major is also suitable for students who wish to become certified as teachers of environmental science and natural resources at the secondary level. In addition, the program provides a solid background for graduate study in several more specialized environmental science disciplines. Environmental science and management majors may meet the educational requirements for state and federal employment as biologists, natural resource specialists, environmental scientists, and other classifications.

The major requires 12 credits of introductory professional courses, which include natural resource conservation, resource economics, introductory soil science, and environmental data analysis. As part of the basic science requirements, environmental science and management majors must complete three to four credits in general botany, three to four credits in general zoology, three credits in introductory ecology, eight credits in introductory physics, four credits in physical geology, three to four credits in geomorphology or introductory microbiology or introductory biochemistry, eight credits in introductory chemistry, four credits in organic chemistry, three credits in introductory calculus, and three credits in introductory statistics. Required concentration courses (26 credits) must be taken at the 300 level or above; at least 18 credits must be selected from courses offered by the Department of Natural Resources Science. (Please note that internships, seminars, and special projects may not be counted toward the concentration.) In addition, one course must be selected from each of the following groups: biological or ecological science; water and soil science; methods in environmental science; natural resources management; and economics, planning, policy, and law. These and the remaining concentration credits should be selected from courses offered by the Department of Natural Resources Science or from an approved list of courses. Supporting electives (20-23 credits) must be selected from an approved list of courses mostly at the 300 and 400 levels.

Click here for a copy (pdf format) of the most current course checksheet for the Envrionmental Science and Management major.

Wildlife Biology and Management
The major in wildlife biology and management, offered through the Department of Natural Resources Science, prepares students for professional careers in the public and private sectors of wildlife biology. In addition, the major provides a solid background for graduate study. Wildlife biologists are professionals concerned with the scientific management of the earth's wildlife species and their habitats. Wildlife biologists work in the areas of preservation, conservation, and management of wildlife species. Graduates can become Certified Wildlife Biologists (CWBs) who are recognized by the Wildlife Society, an international professional organization. In addition, wildlife majors meet the educational requirements for state and federal employment in the wildlife profession.

The major requires 12 credits of professional courses, which include natural resource conservation, resource economics, introductory soil science, and environmental data analysis. As part of the basic science requirements, wildlife majors must complete three to four credits in general botany, three to four credits in general zoology, three credits in introductory ecology, eight credits in introductory physics, four credits in physical geology, four credits in introductory chemistry, four credits in organic chemistry, three credits in introductory calculus, and three credits in introductory statistics. Required concentration courses (22-23 credits) include: three credits in principles of wildlife management; four credits in field botany and taxonomy; three credits in wetland wildlife or nongame and endangered species management; six credits chosen from field ornithology, biology of mammals, vertebrate biology, or animal behavior; three to four credits in introduction to forest science, wetland wildlife management, wetland ecology, living aquatic resources, or fishery science; and three credits in either wildlife biometrics or introduction to computing. Supporting electives (31-32 credits) must be selected from approved lists and include the following upper-division course work: three credits in botany; six credits in zoology; six credits in resource policy or administration, environmental law, or land use planning; and six credits in communications. An additional 10-11 credits of supporting electives must be selected from concentration electives or from other 300- or 400-level NRS courses.

Click here for a copy (pdf format) of the most current course checksheet for the Wildlife Biology and Management major.


Water and Soil Science
The major in water and soil science, offered by the Department of Natural Resources Science, is designed to meet the growing demand for training in the science and management of land and water resources. Course tracks in soil science and water resources provide in-depth training in specific, career-related disciplines. With proper course selection, students are eligible for professional certification by the American Society of Agronomy and the Soil Science Society of America. The water and soil science major provides a strong background for work in state and federal regulatory agencies or consulting firms that address land use or environmental contamination issues. Training in water and soil science also provides excellent preparation for graduate study.

The major requires 12 credits of professional courses, which include natural resource conservation, resource economics, introductory soil science, and environmental data analysis. As part of the basic science requirements, water and soil science students must complete three to four credits in general botany, three to four credits in general zoology, three credits in introductory ecology, eight credits in introductory physics, four credits in physical geology, three to four credits in geomorphology or introductory microbiology or introductory biochemistry, eight credits in introductory chemistry, four credits in organic chemistry, three credits in introductory calculus, and three credits in introductory statistics. Required concentration courses (29-33 credits) include at least 12-13 credits selected from methods in soil and water analysis, soil morphology practicum, soil-water chemistry, soil conservation and land use, plant nutrition and soil fertility, soil-water relations, microbial ecology of soils and sediments, soil morphology and mapping, and soil genesis and classification; and 17-20 credits selected from concepts in GIS, fundamentals of GIS, wetland ecology, wetlands and land use, soil and water conservation technology, hydrology and water management, advanced GIS, water quality sampling and analysis, aquatic entomology, introduction to sedimentation and stratigraphy, general oceanography, and limnology. Supporting electives (13-17 credits) must be selected from approved lists or from remaining concentration electives.

Click here for a copy (pdf format) of the most current course checksheet for the Water and Soil Science major.